Anatomical UV Tattoos

In normal light.

In both lights.

All black light.

This is awesome! It’s like having x-ray vision, and for sure the craziest thing I’ve seen in a while! See more here.

Black light tattoos use a UV-reactive tattoo ink that can be seen under a black light but are invisible or only partially visible in normal light.

Given its extensive testing for FDA approval, with absolutely no adverse reactions to it in over ten years, it is all in the proof, this ink is most likely the safest ink on the market.

[via TattooArtists.org]

 

 

14 thoughts on “Anatomical UV Tattoos”

  1. If you have a Laser Quest near you, you’d be the idiot everybody’d shoot for but you’d be the cool idiot with a tattoo noone else has. C;

  2. awesome tattoo, will definitely consider the uv tat as a huge possibility…..thanks for the incredible idea, that tat is really cool….

  3. fascinating and communicative, but would participate in something more on this topic?

  4. Good point Linda, didn’t even think about that photo being taken right after finishing the tattoo! Despite my obsession with anatomy tattoos, I’m a still a tattoo noobie.

  5. Vanessa, most tattoo photographs are taken by the artist right after the work is finished. (They may never get another chance to document their design!) The inflammation you see in the picture about is temporary, and the shine of the ointment applied to help healing only exaggerates the appearance of the swelling. I think of it as the Braille stage. For two or three days, someone can “read” a tattoo with their eyes closed. They shouldn’t (that’s a good way to cause infection), but they could.

    You don’t have to wait to stumble across a black light. If I had a tattoo that glowed under UV, I would have a black light at home so I could enjoy it and show it off. Oh, wait, I already have a black light at home. What I need now is the tattoo.

  6. While this is a very cool idea, I have two issues with the blacklight tattoo.

    Firstly, in normal light the tattoo looks like a burn on the skin, which is not so aesthetically pleasing. This is only judging from the first picture above so I can’t generalize the comment to every blacklight tattoo.

    Secondly, unless you’re a club kid, how often are you exposed to black lights?

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